Scam baiter: Why I risk death threats to expose online cons – BBC News

Scam baiter: Why I risk death threats to expose online cons - BBC News

Scam baiter: Why I risk death threats to expose online cons – BBC News

In the flesh, Wayne May (not his real name) is an affable gentleman in his late 40s, softly spoken with a lilting Welsh accent.When we meet he’s casually dressed in jeans and a Batman T-shirt. He works full-time as a carer.On the net, he’s a tireless defender of scam victims and a fearless scam baiter – a person who deliberately contacts scammers, engages with them and then publishes as much information about them as possible in order to warn others.He regularly receives death threats, and his website, Scam Survivors, is often subjected to attempted DDoS attacks – where a site is maliciously hit with lots of web traffic to try to knock it offline.But Mr May is determined to continue helping scamming victims in his spare time, and has a team of volunteers in the US, Canada and Europe doing the same.

Källa: Scam baiter: Why I risk death threats to expose online cons – BBC News

Russian propaganda may have been shared hundreds of millions of times, new research says – The Washington Post

Russian propaganda may have been shared hundreds of millions of times, new research says - The Washington Post

Russian propaganda may have been shared hundreds of millions of times, new research says – The Washington Post

Facebook has said ads bought by Russian operatives reached 10 million of its users.But does that include everyone reached by the information operation? Couldn’t the Russians also have created simple — and free — Facebook posts and hoped they went viral? And if so, how many times were these messages seen by Facebook’s massive user base?The answers to those questions, which social media analyst Jonathan Albright studied for a research document he posted online Thursday, are: No. Yes. And hundreds of millions — perhaps many billions — of times.

Källa: Russian propaganda may have been shared hundreds of millions of times, new research says – The Washington Post

Ferryman at the wall

Ferryman at the wall

Ferryman at the wall

 

A visitor’s guide to America’s great big border wall.

Originally proposed as an international peace park with Mexico, Big Bend, Texas has a unique relationship with its southern neighbor. For the past 40 years, Mike Davidson has been ferrying tourists across the Rio Grande for a little taste of Mexican life?—?but now a great big border wall might divide the park.

Captions available in English and Spanish. Let us know if you’ve got a language you’d like to see.

Color made possible by FilmConvert.

Who do you trust? How data is helping us decide | Technology | The Guardian

Who do you trust? How data is helping us decide | Technology | The Guardian

Who do you trust? How data is helping us decide | Technology | The Guardian

My first lesson in the dangers of trusting strangers came in 1983, not long after I turned five, when an unfamiliar woman entered our house. Doris, from Glasgow, was in her late 20s and starting as our nanny. My mum had found her through a posh magazine called The Lady.Doris arrived wearing a Salvation Army uniform, complete with bonnet. “I remember her thick Scottish accent,” Mum recalls. “She told me she’d worked with kids of a similar age and was a member of the Salvation Army because she enjoyed helping people. But, honestly, she had me at hello.”Doris lived with us for 10 months. For the most part she was a good nanny – cheerful, reliable and helpful. There was nothing unusual about her, aside from a few unexplained absences at weekends.

Källa: Who do you trust? How data is helping us decide | Technology | The Guardian

Who do you trust? How data is helping us decide | Technology | The Guardian

Who do you trust? How data is helping us decide | Technology | The Guardian

Who do you trust? How data is helping us decide | Technology | The Guardian

My first lesson in the dangers of trusting strangers came in 1983, not long after I turned five, when an unfamiliar woman entered our house. Doris, from Glasgow, was in her late 20s and starting as our nanny. My mum had found her through a posh magazine called The Lady.Doris arrived wearing a Salvation Army uniform, complete with bonnet. “I remember her thick Scottish accent,” Mum recalls. “She told me she’d worked with kids of a similar age and was a member of the Salvation Army because she enjoyed helping people. But, honestly, she had me at hello.”Doris lived with us for 10 months. For the most part she was a good nanny – cheerful, reliable and helpful. There was nothing unusual about her, aside from a few unexplained absences at weekends.

Källa: Who do you trust? How data is helping us decide | Technology | The Guardian

Mackens Fråga: Vad vill du se i nya Apple Watch?