FaceApp launches 'blackface' feature, then deletes it after social backlash – BBC Newsbeat

FaceApp launches 'blackface' feature, then deletes it after social backlash - BBC Newsbeat

FaceApp launches ‘blackface’ feature, then deletes it after social backlash – BBC Newsbeat

FaceApp has removed a feature which changed people’s ethnicity in selfies less than 24 hours after updating it.The app, which launched in early 2017, changes photos with filters to make users look older, younger or swap gender.But its latest feature was criticised for being racist within minutes of going live.It allowed people to change their faces to look more black, Asian, Indian or Caucasian in photos.FaceApp was criticised in April for its “hot” filter which lightened skin tones.More related storiesSexism in tech ‘needs to be called out’Shockingly sexist adverts from the pastDeath threats over black love interest musicSome users say they were shocked by the new update before even opening the app.

Källa: FaceApp launches ‘blackface’ feature, then deletes it after social backlash – BBC Newsbeat

FaceApp launches ‘blackface’ feature, then deletes it after social backlash – BBC Newsbeat

FaceApp launches 'blackface' feature, then deletes it after social backlash - BBC Newsbeat

FaceApp launches ‘blackface’ feature, then deletes it after social backlash – BBC Newsbeat

FaceApp has removed a feature which changed people’s ethnicity in selfies less than 24 hours after updating it.The app, which launched in early 2017, changes photos with filters to make users look older, younger or swap gender.But its latest feature was criticised for being racist within minutes of going live.It allowed people to change their faces to look more black, Asian, Indian or Caucasian in photos.FaceApp was criticised in April for its “hot” filter which lightened skin tones.More related storiesSexism in tech ‘needs to be called out’Shockingly sexist adverts from the pastDeath threats over black love interest musicSome users say they were shocked by the new update before even opening the app.

Källa: FaceApp launches ‘blackface’ feature, then deletes it after social backlash – BBC Newsbeat

Alleged vDOS Operators Arrested, Charged — Krebs on Security

Alleged vDOS Operators Arrested, Charged — Krebs on Security

Alleged vDOS Operators Arrested, Charged — Krebs on Security

Two young Israeli men alleged by this author to have co-founded vDOS — until recently the largest and most profitable cyber attack-for-hire service online — were arrested and formally indicted this week in Israel on conspiracy and hacking charges.On Sept. 8, 2016, KrebsOnSecurity published a story about the hacking of vDOS, a service that attracted tens of thousands of paying customers and facilitated more than two million distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks over the four year period it was in business.That story named two then 18-year-old Israelis — Yarden “applej4ck” Bidani and Itay “p1st” Huri — as the likely owners and operators of vDOS. Within hours of that story’s publication the two were detained by Israeli police, placed on house arrest for 10 days, and forbidden from using the Internet for a month.

Källa: Alleged vDOS Operators Arrested, Charged — Krebs on Security

Developers file antitrust complaint against Apple in China

Developers file antitrust complaint against Apple in China

Developers file antitrust complaint against Apple in China

BEIJING (Reuters) – A Chinese law firm has filed a complaint against Apple Inc (AAPL.O) on behalf of 28 local developers alleging the firm breached antitrust regulations.The complaint, lodged by Beijing-based Dare & Sure Law Firm, accuses Apple of charging excessive fees and removing apps from its local store without proper explanation, Lin Wei, an attorney at the firm told Reuters on Thursday.”During its localization process Apple has run into several antitrust issues … after an initial investigation we consulted a number of enterprises and got a very strong response,” said Lin.

Källa: Developers file antitrust complaint against Apple in China

Bloom

Bloom

Bloom

 

In April this year, director Julian Lucas went on holiday to Japan – his camera came with him.

The result is the film Bloom.

He discovered a peculiar sense of quiet, desolation, and loneliness among the people.
In a country so packed with lights and trains and crowds and experiences, from the theatrical to the serene to patently bizarre, Bloom captures this lovely dichotomy between the people and the cities they inhabit. Inside the noise and the chaos, Julian captures people alone, wandering the streets, buried in telephones – a dull, menacing and peaceful nothingness below the surface.

What’s most inspiring about the footage is the way that it doesn’t struggle or form its way into any kind of narrative – Julian just lets the film be exactly what it is. But in that loose process, which is unlikely an accident, there’s this dizzying repetition that tells us something quite profound about Japanese culture. The score, too, by Matt Hadley, dances with the vision. At times intense and jarring, edited cleverly to interplay with the captured audio. At times serene and beautiful, with layered synths and string lines that dance softly up and down the keyboard.

“I wanted the soundtrack to be it’s own character,” says Julian. “I wanted the viewer to be as audibly stimulated as they are visually. And I wanted sounds from the real world to contribute to the rhythm and pacing of the piece.”

 

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